Public Policy

The Brussels Effect and Artificial Intelligence

Authors

Abstract

The European Union is likely to introduce among the first, and most comprehensive AI regulatory regimes of the world’s major jurisdictions. We ask whether the EU’s upcoming regulation for AI will diffuse globally, producing a so-called “Brussels Effect”. Extending Anu Bradford’s work, we outline the mechanisms by which such regulatory diffusion may occur. We consider both the possibility that the EU’s AI regulation will incentivise changes in products offered in non-EU countries (a de facto Brussels Effect) and the possibility it will influence regulation adopted by other jurisdictions (a de jure Brussels Effect). Focusing on the proposed EU AI Act, we tentatively conclude that both de facto and de jure Brussels effects are likely. A de facto effect is particularly likely to arise in large US tech companies with “high-risk” AI systems. The upcoming regulation might be important in offering the first operationalisation of developing and deploying trustworthy AI.

Content

Thumbnail image of 630534b77182a3513398500f_Brussels_Effect_GovAI.pdf

Supplementary weblinks

Webpage of the Report
The European Union is likely to introduce among the first, most stringent, and most comprehensive AI regulatory regimes of the world’s major jurisdictions. In this report, we ask whether the EU’s upcoming regulation for AI will diffuse globally, producing a so-called “Brussels Effect”.

Comments

Log in or register with APSA to comment
Comments are not moderated before they are posted, but they can be removed by the site moderators if they are found to be in contravention of our Commenting and Discussion Policy [opens in a new tab] – please read this policy before you post. Comments should be used for scholarly discussion of the content in question. You can find more information about how to use the commenting feature here [opens in a new tab] .